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View Full Version : New invention to roll off/hook lift containers, your judgement please


Harrys
04-02-2015, 09:30 PM
I am in the progress of developing a new invention to the roll off/hook lift containers. It's a device that will help you move these boxes around on a work site. The work site has to be on solid ground. Work that is carried out on paved or concrete ground would benefit from this solution.

I'm from Norway and we use these boxes all the time, but we have always problems when we need to move them locally on site due to their heavy weight.

Is there anybody in here that use this boxes when you are digging in city streets or industry areas? If so, please tell me your thoughts about this.

See : www.jack-pack.as for details.

d4c24a
04-02-2015, 09:43 PM
would be a good idea for rollonoffs , i find the steel wheels on the ones here never last long of are bent , jammed

Harrys
04-02-2015, 09:50 PM
Yes I know about this solution. This works only for standard ISO shipping containers and it will not fit to the roll off/ hook lift system, but thanks for your reply.

d4c24a
04-02-2015, 09:55 PM
Yes I know about this solution. This works only for standard ISO shipping containers and it will not fit to the roll off/ hook lift system, but thanks for your reply.

yes i got mixed up so changed it to avoid confusion :)

Harrys
04-02-2015, 10:03 PM
would be a good idea for rollonoffs , i find the steel wheels on the ones here never last long of are bent , jammed

The steel wheels can be made from different materials and thickness. On our test platform we use steel rollers with rubber coating for better road protection and ball bearings to avoid jamming.

JD450A
04-02-2015, 10:08 PM
There already is a device for sale in the UK that fits to the front of a wheel loader or similar which allows you to move the container via the front hook point. Realistically anywhere that uses a Roll on will have something sufficient to move it i'm afraid.

Harrys
04-02-2015, 10:16 PM
There already is a device for sale in the UK that fits to the front of a wheel loader or similar which allows you to move the container via the front hook point. Realistically anywhere that uses a Roll on will have something sufficient to move it i'm afraid.

I know about this wheel loader solution. The problem is that we don't have a wheel loader available all the time, espesially when we work in tight city streets where space is limited. An excavator will not lift the front end of the container if it's heavy loaded, except if it's a realy big rug.

doobin
04-02-2015, 10:18 PM
Looks a handy bit of kit so long as the price is realistic.

Shovelhands
04-02-2015, 10:18 PM
Most sites here will push/pull the roll on/off if needed, with whatever they have, with little regard for the skip. I can't see anyone paying extra for a roll on/off fitted with this system? :confused:

Harrys
04-02-2015, 10:26 PM
Most sites here will push/pull the roll on/off if needed, with whatever they have, with little regard for the skip. I can't see anyone paying extra for a roll on/off fitted with this system? :confused:

We also do, if we have what's needed to do it. We don't always have, that's the problem. The unit is not fitted permanent on the box, it's only an attachment that you put on when needed on some special worksites.

d4c24a
05-02-2015, 06:11 AM
to be fair the amenity site near me has quite a few bins and no way of moving them , they have to shut the gates and get the lorry to move bins about when he turns up for a swap over can take quite a while sometimes , would also be good where hight is a issue underground carparks etc :)

Traxcavator.
05-02-2015, 06:28 AM
We don't use bins, as we call them, for street works. Bulk digging will see a tipper truck pull up, be loaded and then get out if the way with its load. Smaller works have the muck collected by grab loader trucks as and when needed.
Using these boxes for street works is not a good idea unless they are filled quickly with the truck waiting with it and clearing off when it's full.

Harrys
05-02-2015, 07:08 AM
We don't use bins, as we call them, for street works. Bulk digging will see a tipper truck pull up, be loaded and then get out if the way with its load. Smaller works have the muck collected by grab loader trucks as and when needed.
Using these boxes for street works is not a good idea unless they are filled quickly with the truck waiting with it and clearing off when it's full.

We use these bins all the time for street works. The reason for that is that it usually take some time to load them because of all the pipes, cables and other utilities under ground. A tipper truck waiting for hours to be loaded costs money.

Traxcavator.
05-02-2015, 07:59 AM
Yes of course a standing truck is costly. Utilities excavation in this country is no different. The machine operator will tend to heap the arising as he goes and a grab truck will arrive when a full load is available. Load and go. Larger excavations can sometimes involve a small dumper which will take the arisings to a storage area where they are collected by the grab truck or loaded into a tipper by the machine. As I said larger excavations will warrant a tipper waiting for upto half an hour for loading. Bringing a bin to site and then collecting it later involves two visits to site and two of those journeys see the truck with no bin on as it has to go from its yard or provirus drop. Most utility contractors here also own their own tippers so waiting is no where near as costly. The bin drop idea makes sense but obviously has it's problems and downfalls.
The grab truck will also supply and often place back fill materials as he goes. They often will be loading the truck at one end with a risings whilst still unloading the fill. That's what we call utilisation ... :)

d4c24a
05-02-2015, 08:21 AM
they are being used more on street works these days to tip into with a dumper problems with silt run off , road damage ,and contamination is leading to them being used more and more , london is a good place to see this happening , grab turns up and empties bin keeps it all nice and clean
Cappagh recently did some storm drain work in Wokingham and had a 20 yard bin to tip in ,drive in the back door :)

many years ago when i worked on the BT duct laying we had normal chain skips that were dropped off for the smaller jobs , worked well for the right jobs :)

Traxcavator.
05-02-2015, 09:10 AM
I have seen purpose built holding tanks. I can see using a skip can give the silts time to drain if it has drain holes. A roll on off would drain out of the doors I guess. Graham do they often just drop the bin to be loaded and collect later as with scrap or rubbish ? I can see exchanging bins in the street being hassle.

d4c24a
05-02-2015, 10:03 AM
the problem with the silts is rain run off ,road gullies etc so we are told :rolleyes: , on smaller jobs it is a good idea ,the grab can come along and get a load from out of the bin , keeping everything nice and clean , although some will find this a challenge :D

doobin
05-02-2015, 10:09 AM
Let's not forget that Scandinavian working practices are very different from over here.

Harry, if RoRos are used a lot in your country and this gadget is a reasonable price, I'm sure it will sell.

Tipping into a skip and then collecting with a grab is a great idea. This gadget would keep the skip in the right place.

Traxcavator.
05-02-2015, 11:21 AM
I would fabricate two brackets that would be welded to the front of the bin and on lowering two rollers would be fitted into a couple of slots and a quick releasing catch would hold them in place whilst the bin was fully lowered. Then you could push it along with the machine. Or after the truck has left you could lift the bin and the fit the wheels. I would use wide rollers rubber coated with heavy duty caged ball rearing assembly's. Would also replace the rear wheels with this type for this type of road work.

V8Druid
05-02-2015, 11:33 AM
It's a neat device and a good idea, but how do you handle what is going to be a very top heavy unit when it's solo/not attached to a skip, on a mono roller? :confused:
It would also need some serious tractive effort to move a skip from stationary, especially if loaded or partially filled?:rolleyes:

On anything other than a very good surface, rollers of these sort of sizes are very difficult to get moving and come to a grinding halt with the merest of obstructions - small stones, etc.

I've moved a lot of heavy stuff about on skates and made a set of skates with larger than normal rollers for one particular job-even they required a very clean surface to function easily and ground to a halt with the slightest of obstructions - nature of the beast - I'll try find some pix to add!!

Harrys
05-02-2015, 12:09 PM
I would fabricate two brackets that would be welded to the front of the bin and on lowering two rollers would be fitted into a couple of slots and a quick releasing catch would hold them in place whilst the bin was fully lowered. Then you could push it along with the machine. Or after the truck has left you could lift the bin and the fit the wheels. I would use wide rollers rubber coated with heavy duty caged ball rearing assembly's. Would also replace the rear wheels with this type for this type of road work.

I have seen this as a permanent solution already on some comprimator containers. It works for straight line moving, but it would not turn if needed.

As for the rollers we also use rubber coated with ball bearings.

Harrys
05-02-2015, 12:24 PM
It's a neat device and a good idea, but how do you handle what is going to be a very top heavy unit when it's solo/not attached to a skip, on a mono roller? :confused:
It would also need some serious tractive effort to move a skip from stationary, especially if loaded or partially filled?:rolleyes:

On anything other than a very good surface, rollers of these sort of sizes are very difficult to get moving and come to a grinding halt with the merest of obstructions - small stones, etc.

I've moved a lot of heavy stuff about on skates and made a set of skates with larger than normal rollers for one particular job-even they required a very clean surface to function easily and ground to a halt with the slightest of obstructions - nature of the beast - I'll try find some pix to add!!

Regarding top Heavy : it would not tilt completely over, it will however bend over a bit if not even loaded. Remember it sits on two rollers in the rear end. On steep grading it could be a problem thoe.
You will also have the possibility to just lift it slightly off the ground and then it would not tilt more than until the frame hit the ground.

Regarding moving: We are doing test driving with a flatbed that is loaded to 25 tons. The site is clean and we have so fare done it without any special problems using a tractor or forklift truck.

Traxcavator.
05-02-2015, 03:03 PM
I don't suppose a lot of steering has to be done in the street and I would think in a yard pulling the bin to one side then pushing it back whilst doing the same would see it alter course. However I would think you could try a castor type fixing on the front wheels to aid steering ... Maybe

Harrys
05-02-2015, 04:02 PM
I don't suppose a lot of steering has to be done in the street and I would think in a yard pulling the bin to one side then pushing it back whilst doing the same would see it alter course. However I would think you could try a castor type fixing on the front wheels to aid steering ... Maybe

Of course it can be done in other ways, this is just a new solution to a problem :)

Harrys
05-02-2015, 06:59 PM
One should see it as a pallet truck with about the same properties as it has. Is it loaded high with crates and it begins to topple then the top of the load fall off. Approximately so will a hook lift container also behave with this solution.

I've never experienced that a pallet truck itself has overturned, but it has happened that it leans over so that parts of the load falls off.

However, one must always consider the conditions in which you use this equipment.

Safety first as usual.

V8Druid
05-02-2015, 08:06 PM
I think I've missed the point here slightly - I'd assumed this to be a motive/tractive self powered unit :o not a towed castor type device.

I wrongly assumed that this was something like the caravan 'tugs' you see for positioning, off the vehicle (but I was half off my face still, this morning, on last night's pain killers :o )!!

It's essentially a roller jack that is going to need towing/pushing about and I'd say looks pretty capable.:cool:

Harrys
05-02-2015, 08:29 PM
It's essentially a roller jack that is going to need towing/pushing about and I'd say looks pretty capable.:cool:

This is quite correct perceived :)

Davejcb
05-02-2015, 09:12 PM
http://cwmags.co.uk/cwuk-2-7/ed-pix/cwmags-jcb_Skip-th.jpg

Job done :D

Harrys
05-02-2015, 09:25 PM
http://cwmags.co.uk/cwuk-2-7/ed-pix/cwmags-jcb_Skip-th.jpg

Job done :D

Yes this is a well known solution. There is also another solution that I have shown on my webpage

Se it here : http://www.jack-pack.as/why-.html

V8Druid
05-02-2015, 09:29 PM
Yes this is a well known solution. There is also another solution that I have shown on my webpage

Se it here : http://www.jack-pack.as/why-.html

now that's teh sort of tug I had in mind - on a big scale though - could you not motorise your wheels somehow and negate the need for a separate motive/tractive unit????:rolleyes::)

whitman55
05-02-2015, 09:49 PM
What about brakes? Put 4 free wheeling wheels on a container and it'll end up at the bottom of the smallest incline. From what i'v read your not intending a operator riding on the container with his hand on the brakes - like you have on a pallet truck.

V8Druid
05-02-2015, 09:52 PM
What about brakes? Put 4 free wheeling wheels on a container and it'll end up at the bottom of the smallest incline. From what i'v read your not intending a operator riding on the container with his hand on the brakes - like you have on a pallet truck.

Pallet truck technique - 1/2 " off the deck and dump at the first sign of trouble :D:D

Harrys
05-02-2015, 09:54 PM
now that's teh sort of tug I had in mind - on a big scale though - could you not motorise your wheels somehow and negate the need for a separate motive/tractive unit????:rolleyes::)

Of course, but this solution exists already so what would the point of that be? :) It would also be very costly.

The whole idea is just to be able to fend for yourselves with what you have on site without the help of a wheel loader and the like. Many times you often have only an 8 tonne excavator on site for example and there is lot of other examples.

With a Jack-Pack you will have the opportunity to let the container hang on to the excavator while you move around the workplace. That means always directly behind you (or in front or beside, it depends) :)

Harrys
05-02-2015, 10:02 PM
What about brakes? Put 4 free wheeling wheels on a container and it'll end up at the bottom of the smallest incline. From what i'v read your not intending a operator riding on the container with his hand on the brakes - like you have on a pallet truck.

This unit is designed to be used with or without hydraulic cylinders. If you are in such conditions that brakes are essential then you need to go for the hydraulic kit. If you run into problems then you just drop it to the ground provided that the hydraulics are connected and it will stop.

Also when you unhook it from the pulling machine and park it you should drop it to the ground for safety reasons.

whitman55
05-02-2015, 10:28 PM
Pallet truck technique - 1/2 " off the deck and dump at the first sign of trouble :D:D

Exactly been know to ride down quite a slope with the pallet just rubbing on the ground.

This unit is designed to be used with or without hydraulic cylinders. If you are in such conditions that brakes are essential then you need to go for the hydraulic kit. If you run into problems then you just drop it to the ground provided that the hydraulics are connected and it will stop.

Also when you unhook it from the pulling machine and park it you should drop it to the ground for safety reasons.

Are you thinking of attaching it to the machines aux circuit? what happens when a chain/ strap brakes or if you get carried away with a pick-up / small plant and need to bring the box to a stop quickly?

Shovelhands
05-02-2015, 11:00 PM
Exactly been know to ride down quite a slope with the pallet just rubbing on the ground.



Are you thinking of attaching it to the machines aux circuit? what happens when a chain/ strap brakes or if you get carried away with a pick-up / small plant and need to bring the box to a stop quickly?

Just what I've been thinking, sounds like an accident waiting to happen. There's a big safety issue with moving one of these bins around like this, especially when loaded! Not to mention potential damage to inadequate machines/vehicles being used, even if a small maching can get it moving then , as has been said, being able to stop it is quite another matter! The roller wheels on the back are not designed for the bin to be towed about.

I do get the idea, sort of, but there's just to many things that could go wrong or be wrong for this to work, a small kerb of just an inch high could stop it dead. I get the fact that it has to be used on good flat surfaces, but if the bin was able to be moved around in rough conditions in tight spaces where a truck could struggle then it may find more favour?

The fact is there's only one thing that a roll on/off bin should be moved by and that's a hook lift truck!

Harry, I'm sure you've done your homework and have identified a market for this product, but I don't see enough situations for them here, where people are willing to spend even more money on a skip?
How many units do you have being used?
Is this something you see being owned by the user/hirer of the bin, so they can make better use of it or is it something to be owned by the company supplying the bin? Can the bin be picked up / collected with this system still fitted? Are there special brackets or holes that must be fitted to the bin in order for this to be used?

Traxcavator.
06-02-2015, 05:28 AM
Roll on Off bins aren't designed to moved around. They shouldn't be dropped on slopes or moved down them. They have to be moved about occaisionaly,obviously, most often in yards, this often is down to bad management of the yard. I don't think having this sort of equipment on sites like road works would be pratcal. It has to be stored and carried and fitted etc, can you see road work gangs in the UK phaffing around with this ? I can't. It will also have to be tested and checked every year or 6 months. It will almost certainly get stolen given half the chance. The cost would also be a problem. Take the likes of Clancy's, how many sets would they need if they went over to using bins on the road. Leaving bins this size on the road also has other issues such lighting and obstruction. You don't see bins on English roads because in most circumstances they are not practical. If indeed they are needed, I can't see them needing to be steered or braked as if you got to a slope or bend you finish off here and call in the truck. If I had to use a bin and have it movable, in certain circumstances, i would go with my own Idea and fit wheels similar to the rear ones, as I said, and then push it along until conditions proved impractical. Cheap and far more practical. That is my Judgement. :)

Harrys
06-02-2015, 12:34 PM
Exactly been know to ride down quite a slope with the pallet just rubbing on the ground.



Are you thinking of attaching it to the machines aux circuit? what happens when a chain/ strap brakes or if you get carried away with a pick-up / small plant and need to bring the box to a stop quickly?

Regarding riding down a slope: This is not considered a brake system, itís just a kind of emergency stop if needed.

Regarding hydraulic connections. Yes I think of the machines aux circuit.

Regarding chain/strap breakage: Iím not sure what you mean. This unit is provided with a drawbar and is to be hooked to a tow hook on the machine/tractor, not to be pulled by chains or straps.

Harrys
06-02-2015, 12:39 PM
Just what I've been thinking, sounds like an accident waiting to happen. There's a big safety issue with moving one of these bins around like this, especially when loaded! Not to mention potential damage to inadequate machines/vehicles being used, even if a small maching can get it moving then , as has been said, being able to stop it is quite another matter! The roller wheels on the back are not designed for the bin to be towed about.

I do get the idea, sort of, but there's just to many things that could go wrong or be wrong for this to work, a small kerb of just an inch high could stop it dead. I get the fact that it has to be used on good flat surfaces, but if the bin was able to be moved around in rough conditions in tight spaces where a truck could struggle then it may find more favour?

The fact is there's only one thing that a roll on/off bin should be moved by and that's a hook lift truck!

Harry, I'm sure you've done your homework and have identified a market for this product, but I don't see enough situations for them here, where people are willing to spend even more money on a skip?
How many units do you have being used?
Is this something you see being owned by the user/hirer of the bin, so they can make better use of it or is it something to be owned by the company supplying the bin? Can the bin be picked up / collected with this system still fitted? Are there special brackets or holes that must be fitted to the bin in order for this to be used?

Regarding the safety issues of container moving:
Are you referring to the chain/strap breakage what Whitman mentioning about? If so, there is no such thing here, itís provided with a drawbar.

Regarding potential damage to inadequate machines:
You have to choose the operating machine using common sense and make sure it can do whatís needed.

As for the rollers: These containers are already moved around with other solutions already on the market. Itís possible to change to rollers with ball bearings if desired, thatís the customers choice.

A small curb could stop it, but that is not a catastrophe as I see it.
This is not a solution to move containers in rough conditions because of the small rollers provided on such containers, but it does easily maneuver in tight spaces.

You say that only hook lift trucks should move these containers, and yes, on a public road this is so true. On work sites there is already other solutions on the market and Jack-Pack is just another solution thatís coming.

Regarding how many units I have used: The answer is none so far, but we are testing a prototype these days. When we are satisfied with this prototype we would produce maybe 5 units to test out in real work conditions.

Whoís going to be the owner of these units? Iíll say yes to all who you mention about. Itís just another choice for everyone who is interested.
And yes, the bin can be picked up with the system still fitted. It is easily removed if you like to, but it can just sit on the container all the time. It adds approx. 35 cm to the length of it and also some weight, but you have the choice to just detach it and replace it with a hook if you like. And yes there is special bracket and holes to be fitted before you can use it.

Harrys
06-02-2015, 12:42 PM
Roll on Off bins aren't designed to moved around. They shouldn't be dropped on slopes or moved down them. They have to be moved about occaisionaly,obviously, most often in yards, this often is down to bad management of the yard. I don't think having this sort of equipment on sites like road works would be pratcal. It has to be stored and carried and fitted etc, can you see road work gangs in the UK phaffing around with this ? I can't. It will also have to be tested and checked every year or 6 months. It will almost certainly get stolen given half the chance. The cost would also be a problem. Take the likes of Clancy's, how many sets would they need if they went over to using bins on the road. Leaving bins this size on the road also has other issues such lighting and obstruction. You don't see bins on English roads because in most circumstances they are not practical. If indeed they are needed, I can't see them needing to be steered or braked as if you got to a slope or bend you finish off here and call in the truck. If I had to use a bin and have it movable, in certain circumstances, i would go with my own Idea and fit wheels similar to the rear ones, as I said, and then push it along until conditions proved impractical. Cheap and far more practical. That is my Judgement. :)

They are already moved around the work areas with solutions other than Jack Pack solution.
We only offer yet another way to do the same.

How road workers do things in the UK I do not have much of a clue, but I suppose they do about the same as us in Norway.

It can of course be stolen like everything else, one must take precautions with everything.

The testing and certification is probably one good point and joins. :)

Costs must the individual count on. Some places it will pay off, other places not.
I do not know what Clancy's is, but I suppose it is a larger company that operates with roadworks in your area. They must make their own judgments about if this is something for them. Where they place their containers do not have anything with Jack Pack to do, we give them only a possibility extra to make them more mobile.

Naturally, you are free to choose the solutions you want if you have to move those containers, but it surprises me that you will prefer a solution that has neither control or emergency opportunities. Cheaper? Yes, but more practical? Hmm :confused:

Harrys
06-02-2015, 01:05 PM
I must say that I very much appreciate your feedback in this thread.
The product is under development and is not on the market yet. I'm looking for constructive criticism and comments about this so that the product can be the best possible.

The security of this I am very concerned about and it seems to be the same with you on the forum here.
Jack-Pack can be obtained both with and without hydraulics. The version without hydraulics is intended for places that are horizontal so as the floor of an industrial building, bigger horizontal spaces such as parking lots and airports and the like and it must be used with utmost caution.

Jack Pack with hydraulics have the possibility of an emergency stop if necessary. This is by no means a regular brake function and must not be used as such. The vehicle that pulls the container must be able to come to a normal stop with their own brakes.

Jack Pack is not in any way designed to run on public roads or in any other circumstances run in high speed.
We are talking only about moving a container internally in one area and this must of course be done with care.

There is already on the market solutions for moving heavy shipping containers around on sites. These are of the same weight as the hook lift containers and the solutions are without brake function. These have worked for years and the same precautions that apply to this particular solutions has to be applied to the Jack-Pack solution.
See here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abElD-ZOmd8

http://www.tandemloc.com/mobilizing-hydraulic-lift-caster-mega-R17000F-7PA.asp#1

http://www.tandemloc.com/mobilizing-container-cart-32H-T10000C-3PA.asp

This is just a few, there are many more out there without brake systems.

Keep the good comments come, positive or negative I appreciate them all :)

Harrys
07-02-2015, 01:07 PM
to be fair the amenity site near me has quite a few bins and no way of moving them , they have to shut the gates and get the lorry to move bins about when he turns up for a swap over can take quite a while sometimes , would also be good where hight is a issue underground carparks etc :)

Underground parking areas is a new application area for the Jack Pack that I have not previously thought of. I must create a new page on the website under applications areas to show this possibility too. This can become very popular and widely used.

Thank you for sharing a very good idea. :)

GB_Groundworks
08-02-2015, 06:49 PM
saw these few years ago thought good idea, keeps the weight off the warring machine

http://www.mhf.uk.com/Content.aspx?id=7

ill find a smaller pic

Bin Buncha
This is a very handy attachment for loading shovels and telehandlers, which facilitates the movement of hooklift containers around the site with ease and speed.

∑ Can be used to move full or empty containers.

∑ Quick-fit attachment for all makes of machine – JCB, Matbro etc.

∑ Maintenance free.

∑ No need to have a hookloader permanently on site.

∑ Can be used in spaces prohibitive to hookloaders such as where overhead cables are present.
Bin Buncha.JPG

http://www.mhf.uk.com/images/Bin%20Buncha.JPG

GB_Groundworks
08-02-2015, 07:07 PM
unrelated but some cool stuff on here http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2014/12/military-pallets-boxes-containers-part-10-thoughts-trucks-trailers/

Harrys
08-02-2015, 08:46 PM
saw these few years ago thought good idea, keeps the weight off the warring machine

http://www.mhf.uk.com/Content.aspx?id=7

ill find a smaller pic

Bin Buncha
This is a very handy attachment for loading shovels and telehandlers, which facilitates the movement of hooklift containers around the site with ease and speed.

∑ Can be used to move full or empty containers.

∑ Quick-fit attachment for all makes of machine Ė JCB, Matbro etc.

∑ Maintenance free.

∑ No need to have a hookloader permanently on site.

∑ Can be used in spaces prohibitive to hookloaders such as where overhead cables are present.
Bin Buncha.JPG

http://www.mhf.uk.com/images/Bin%20Buncha.JPG

I have not seen this before. It looks good. I tried to find a video of it in practical use, but found nothing.

d4c24a
08-02-2015, 08:59 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oU2jII7Q5Ic

GB_Groundworks
08-02-2015, 09:15 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVO06Jq-7VM#t=53

same principal but for iso containers

GB_Groundworks
08-02-2015, 09:25 PM
with the bin bunch I've seen a video but can't find it there is another one I've seen as well you hook it on the lever it against the bin upon the wheel then the machine just pull it its not actually lifting it

Harrys
08-02-2015, 09:54 PM
with the bin bunch I've seen a video but can't find it there is another one I've seen as well you hook it on the lever it against the bin upon the wheel then the machine just pull it its not actually lifting it

Would like to see it. This principle is almost the same as we started with, but then we rejected it in favor of the solution that we have now.

Harrys
10-02-2015, 08:00 PM
Underground parking areas is a new application area for the Jack Pack that I have not previously thought of. I must create a new page on the website under applications areas to show this possibility too. This can become very popular and widely used.

Thank you for sharing a very good idea. :)

Done! :)

See it here: http://www.jack-pack.as/ground-floor-parkings.html

d4c24a
10-02-2015, 08:32 PM
Do you want me to pm my address for payment :D

Harrys
10-02-2015, 08:35 PM
Do you want me to pm my address for payment :D

I definately own you one :)

d4c24a
10-02-2015, 08:44 PM
I definately own you one :)

Ha ha glad to help :)

Harrys
10-02-2015, 08:51 PM
Ha ha glad to help :)

Many thanks :)

Harrys
27-02-2015, 04:12 PM
We are finally finished with the deformation testing and reinforcements, the device has passed the factory acceptance test and is soon ready for CE-approval.

We have left to finish some Heavy Duty wheel lock's for the device, based on the same principal that was used on this fantastic Norwegian made digger:

See video of this digger machine here and take note of the wheel locks: http://www.jack-pack.as/status-of-development.html

V8Druid
27-02-2015, 09:29 PM
We are finally finished with the deformation testing and reinforcements, the device has passed the factory acceptance test and is soon ready for CE-approval.

We have left to finish some Heavy Duty wheel lock's for the device, based on the same principal that was used on this fantastic Norwegian made digger:

See video of this digger machine here and take note of the wheel locks: http://www.jack-pack.as/status-of-development.html

175MB download :eek: - I'll grow old waiting for that video!!!!! Is it a Broyt with the pegs/sprag dogs in the wheels for brakes?????
That's what you call 'positive locking';):D:D

Harrys
27-02-2015, 11:22 PM
175MB download :eek: - I'll grow old waiting for that video!!!!! Is it a Broyt with the pegs/sprag dogs in the wheels for brakes?????
That's what you call 'positive locking';):D:D

Sorry for the big video file, I will try to downsize it. Just have to figure out how.

V8Druid
27-02-2015, 11:29 PM
Sorry for the big video file, I will try to downsize it. Just have to figure out how.

What's the machine Boyo ?
I've just got a clockwork internet connection 500-800kbs average - ona very good day - supposed to be 2 mb but never is - more usually 200kbs - I've had better dial up :eek:

Harrys
28-02-2015, 01:17 AM
Here is a photo collection from google of the Norwegian manufactured broyt:
https://www.google.no/search?q=br%C3%B8yt&hl=no&rlz=1T4GGNI_noNO488NO488&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=7wDxVPe0MOSnygO9_IHQDw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1280&bih=583

Here is a commercial video of it, norwegian speech thoe. From about 1974 i guess.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa5zImOsHIo

V8Druid
28-02-2015, 01:49 AM
Here is a photo collection from google of the Norwegian manufactured broyt:
https://www.google.no/search?q=br%C3%B8yt&hl=no&rlz=1T4GGNI_noNO488NO488&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=7wDxVPe0MOSnygO9_IHQDw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1280&bih=583

Here is a commercial video of it, norwegian speech thoe. From about 1974 i guess.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa5zImOsHIo

That's a great video Harry - a very underestimated tool - love the self mounted bog discs at the end! :cool:

I guessed right on the wheel locks then Boyo!!;)

thanks for putting the video up :cool:

Harrys
30-06-2015, 06:47 PM
Finally I managed to post some videos of it online, you can find them here if you are interested. http://www.jack-pack.as/videos.html

Harrys
05-09-2015, 10:09 PM
Is there anybody in here who are familiar with the hook lift system? There is a lot of container pick-up hook heights on the market today. My question is: what is the standard hook height for the containers in your country? Is it standarised to one specific hight or is there multiple heights going in the same market?

AtlasRob
12-09-2015, 12:57 PM
....... My question is: what is the standard hook height for the containers in your country? Is it standarised to one specific hight or is there multiple heights going in the same market?

Sorry, I cannot answer you question for sure but would assume that there is a standard height for the lift bar else the whole concept of container usage falls apart.
Trays have the bar up on a frame, 40yd bins have it down from the top, I guess its within a given height tolerance of a few 100mm.

Having watched your videos I have to say what a brilliant idea and fair play for taking the idea forward.

My main concern is that container manufacturers are not going to change their designs to incorporate the connection you need.
I may be wrong but guessing there are hundreds of thousands of hook lift bins & trays around the world you need to incorporate a connection to them, including a foot / legs in your (manual) unit rather than on the bin/tray you are intending to move / lift.

Harrys
12-09-2015, 06:30 PM
Sorry, I cannot answer you question for sure but would assume that there is a standard height for the lift bar else the whole concept of container usage falls apart.
Trays have the bar up on a frame, 40yd bins have it down from the top, I guess its within a given height tolerance of a few 100mm.

Having watched your videos I have to say what a brilliant idea and fair play for taking the idea forward.

My main concern is that container manufacturers are not going to change their designs to incorporate the connection you need.
I may be wrong but guessing there are hundreds of thousands of hook lift bins & trays around the world you need to incorporate a connection to them, including a foot / legs in your (manual) unit rather than on the bin/tray you are intending to move / lift.

There are multiple lift heights on the market, here in Norway to my knowledge we use only 1450 mm and this is whats called "the Swedish standard". There is also a German standard of 1570 mm on the world market, but I have never seen it here in Norway. In the US there are both Swedish and German standard and even more, but I'm not sure if they use multiple hook heights within the same district or state. For the UK I think you are using 1570 mm, but I'm not sure. Maybe you have multiple hook heights in the UK also as in the US.

Regarding containers it is my thought that the connection points are adapted to new containers as customers order new, something that happens on a regular basis in the industry. By doing it that way there will not be any significant additional costs for adapting them. It would not be necessary to have this on everyone, but perhaps 10% to begin with for those who want to invest in this new niche market which is now available.

Regarding the leg stands, we could have implemented them on the unit. Its a great idea we will look into. The only thing I'm afraid of is that it has to grow for this to happend. Right now it is a very neat and compact unit and we like to keep it compact.

JD450A
12-09-2015, 06:43 PM
I'll measure the bin up the yard for you this week to give you an idea of it Harry. :)

Harrys
12-09-2015, 07:01 PM
I'll measure the bin up the yard for you this week to give you an idea of it Harry. :)

Thanks, that would be nice :)

AtlasRob
12-09-2015, 10:06 PM
There are multiple lift heights on the market, ............. we use only 1450 mm ................ also a German standard of 1570 mm on the world market, ................. For the UK I think you are using 1570 mm, but I'm not sure..

Different heights but as I suspected less than couple hundred millimetres between them if your info is correct. :cool:

Harrys
30-08-2019, 07:34 PM
New design, more features. What do you think?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqpI3jJlMyw